State Pension age timetable: What age do you get your State Pension? Major update

The State Pension age is slowly increasing and since the Government started making changed to the scheme, many are confused about the age they can receive their State Pension. For more than a decade, since April 2010, the State Pension ages have been undergoing major changes.

What age do you get your State Pension?

The State Pension age is the earliest age you can claim your State Pension and depends on when you were born.

The changes that have been ongoing since 2010 will see the State Pension age rise for women.

Up until 2018, the age rose to 65 for women, but since December of that year, it’s been further increasing for both genders.

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By October 2020, the State Pension age isexpected to have risen to 66.

Maike Currie, director for workplace investing, Fidelity International said: “The age at which you’re able to claim your state pension will depend upon when you’re born, and is currently under review in line with increased life expectancy.

“You may however wish to work beyond this age, either to boost your retirement pot or simply because you want to – our own research shows that almost half (45 percent) of people expect to work into their 70s.

“This doesn’t change the age at which you’re able to draw upon your State Pension, but is something that if claimed while working, may impact your tax position and something you should communicate to your employer to understand how it affects your workplace pension.”

Next week, on Monday, July 6, some will see their State Pension age change.

Anyone born between August 6, 1954 and September 5, 1954 will see their retirement age rise from 65 to 66.

The Pensions Act 2014 brought the increase in the State Pension age from 66 to 67 forward by eight years.

The State Pension age for men and women will now increase to 67 between 2026 and 2028.

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The Government also changed the way in which the increase in State Pension age is phased so rather than reaching State Pension age on a specific date, people born between April 6, 1960 and March 5, 1961 will reach their State Pension age at 66 years and the specified number of months.

To calculate an individual’s State Pension age the following applies:

1) A person born on July 31, 1960 is considered to reach the age of 66 years and 4 months on November 30, 2026.

2) A person born on December 31, 1960 is considered to reach the age of 66 years and nine months on September 30, 2027.

3) A person born on January 31, 1961 is considered to reach the age of 66 years and 10 months on November 30, 2027.

Everyone will reach State Pension age on their 66th birthday from October.

The Government’s Check your State Pension age service tells people when they will reach their State Pension age, under current legislation, based on their gender and date of birth.

The Government is not planning to revise the existing timetables for the equalisation of State Pension age to 65 or the rise in the State Pension age to 66 or 67.

However, the timetable for the increase in the State Pension age from 67 to 68 could change as a result of a review.

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